Macaroning and the invention of verbs

A few weekends ago, while all the cool kids in Brisbane were off harvesting, I was at home macaroning and keeping a storm-stressed dog company. This was only my second attempt at macarons, but instead of making these from scratch, these were a sneaky cheat version by Adriano Zumbo. But even though they are made from a packet, they are still a fussy kind of food to work with. Such is my love of all things salted caramel that I am willing to throw myself once more unto the macaron breach.

Salted caramel macarons

They didn’t turn out perfectly, but I’m blaming all the horrid humidity in the air rather than any skill lacking on my part. The taste is the thing anyway, and they were rich with caramel and salt. So that’s a big tick from me.

While I was macaroning I got to thinking about how much I enjoy making up verbs. For instance, one of my favourites is to do a spot of ‘fassbending’ … this means to watch a film which features the wonderful Michael Fassbender.

The main trouble with making up your own verbs is remembering not to use them in conversations beyond your own home, because people will generally have no idea what you’re talking about, or consider you quite mad. That’s Ok though, it’s simply the price happily paid by those who enjoy a little fassbending.

Am I the only one who makes up her own verbs?

9 thoughts on “Macaroning and the invention of verbs

  1. You macaroned again?! You’re awesome. I haven’t done any since our cooking challenge – I’m not keen on fussy cooking most of the time. Ah yes, I make up verbs and words too. (verbist?). Sometimes not intentionally as my brain moves faster than my mouth and then I end up combining the two words I was considering using and blending them into one instead. (wordblending?) Luckily my husband understands my secret language!

  2. They do look rather delicious, they almost tempt me in to giving it a go but I’m a bit like Lucent Dreaming – I love to cook, but fussy cooking is not for me!

    We make up words all the time. Mainly adjectives but sometimes we throw in the odd verb. A family favourite is ‘shroomy’ (to describe things that are mushroom-ish, of course). Some in the family used to be anti word-making-up but they’ve since changed their tune (mainly after long discussions about how English has evolved and how making up words is kind of integral to its development). We reckon that as long as someone understands what you mean by your made up word then it’s okay!

    ps. I’ve been indulging in a bit of Goslinging (say that ten times quickly!) recently, oh my…

  3. Greetings Tracey – With air now swirling from chilled toward imminent frost, your post placed delightful imaginative packages of seasonal macaroons into immediate consciousness! Oh yes, right now, I’d love to be macaroon’ed at Ladurée in New York! ‘Oh yes please, I’d like an Americano with one of the following: Chocolate Pure Origin from Santo-Domingo; Chestnut; Christmas Flavors; and all right Coconut, if you insist. Thank you kindly!’ Hope my seasonable selection wasn’t too much of ‘A Dangerous Method!’

  4. Hi Tracey. Sorry I haven’t been around much this year. Like you I’ve been trying to find a balance between work and writing (and small children) with mixed success! I just wanted to wish you a very Merry Christmas and here’s hoping that the New Year brings you one (or more!) steps closer to your hearts desire. Cx

  5. oh yes, making up words / verbosing / word-mashing is a most wonderful pastime! I often switch words up, as in “cake eater” becomes “eat caker” or something to that effect. It’s entirely unintentional, but my brain likes to get all dyslexic on me. It amuses the ones around me, so I just go with it.
    I am immensely impressed by your macarooning (kind of sounds like a type of dance, doesn’t it?)! I have as of yet attempted such an extremist baking endeavour. ;)

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